NEW: UpToDate® Anywhere – mobile and remote access

Now you can access all the content of UpToDate from your mobile and tablet. You can also build up free continuing education credits (CME/CE/CPD) when researching clinical questions.

To gain remote and mobile access you just need to complete a quick one-time registration process.

GETTING REGISTERED

  1. Access UpToDate via the BSUH Intranet link

*You must register from within the BSUH NHS network to gain access to the Mobile App and accrue CME credits.

  1. Click the Register button in the upper right corner of the screen.

UpToDate registration

  1. Complete all fields on the registration form and then click Submit Registration.

Upon completion of the registration process, you will receive a confirmation email from UpToDate with instructions on downloading the Mobile App.

MOBILE ACCESS

UpToDate - mobile

Once registered, you can install the Mobile App on up to two devices.

  1. On your smartphone or tablet, find “UpToDate” in your app store and install the free app.
  2. Open the UpToDate Mobile App upon completion of download.
  3. Log in with your UpToDate user name and password.

You only need to do this once — the app remembers your user name and password.

ACCESS UPTODATE ANYWHERE

UpToDate - remoteIn addition to the Mobile App, you can access UpToDate from any computer with internet access.

Simply go to http://www.uptodate.com and click the “Log In” button located in the top right corner of the UpToDate home page, and enter your user name and password

MAINTAINING ACCESS

To keep the account active, you must re-verify your affiliation with BSUH once every 90 days.

Re-verifying your affiliation

Log into UpToDate using the BSUH Intranet link at least once in every 90 days.

In-application & email messaging will inform you of the need to verify affiliation if you have not done so by day 80. You will receive a second alert at day 90.

If you fail to re-verify by day 90, you will lose mobile and remote access.

To regain access, simply login to UpToDate with your user name and password using the BSUH Intranet link as above.

Contact us for more information.

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Help us to help you with patient information

Patient info 2

Do you give your patients information? Perhaps you don’t have time? Would you welcome some support or advice in providing information for the patients you see?

 

 

Fill in our quick survey  to give us a picture of the kind of patient information you currently supply, and what you would like to offer.

Information Standard

The Patient Information Librarian will then be in touch with suggestions, guidance and ideas on how to create good quality patient information.

Thank you!

Top tip for Open Access Week – SHERPA Services

The Centre for Research Communications at the University of Nottingham has developed a suite of free tools to support open access publishing decisions.

sherpa

Will the journal I want to publish in let me make my article freely available?

Use SHERPA ROMEO to search for journal policies on copyright and self-archiving in repositories. There is a handy colour coding system – a green ROMEO journal is one that supports archiving of all versions of your article including the final publisher PDF.

Does my research funder have an open access requirement?

Use SHERPA JULIET to find out if you should choose an open access journal, archive your article in a repository, or both.

Which journals are compatible with my funder’s open access policy?

Use SHERPA FACT for a quick answer.

sherpa screenshot

Contact us for further guidance.

Top tip: how do I find journal abbreviations?

When submitting journal articles or academic work, a frequent requirement is that the list of references should present journal titles in a standard abbreviated form. How can I find these abbreviations?

There’s a standard for these: ISO 4 (Information and documentation – Rules for the abbreviation of title words and titles of publications).

Usually, especially when Vancouver format  is specified, you will be expected to use the format for the National Library of Medicine’s Journals in NCBI Databases. These are the abbreviations used in PubMed and MEDLINE and can be looked up in the NLM Catalog

nlm example

If the journal isn’t in the NLM Catalog, there are other sources to check:

ISI abbreviations (which are used in Web of Science)

CAS Source Index (CASSI) Search Tool (maintained by the American Chemical Society)

Finally, if you can’t find the journal whose title you want to abbreviate in any of these, then you can make your own according to ISO 4 principles, using the ISSN Centre’s List of Title Word Abbreviations.