How did we make a difference in 2016-17? Read our latest annual report

The Brighton and Sussex NHS Library and Knowledge Service Annual Report for 2016-17 has been published.  It briefly illustrates some of the ways our work has made an impact on patient care, service improvement, study, research and clinical teaching over the last year.

Annual Report 2016-17

The report shows how our services were used in comparison to previous years, with many areas showing increased activity in 2016-17.  In particular, the number of evidence search requests received, the number of teaching sessions run and the number of articles provided on request at short notice all went up this year.

Document Supply ChartTeaching chart

Usage of the online journals and databases that we purchase remained high, with only books (both print and electronic) showing a significant dip in usage.  Full details of activity and resource usage can be found in the report, along with case studies of how we made a difference to local staff and students, and updates on our changing team.

You can also read more about how our two clinical librarians are are contributing to Trust polices, guidelines and workforce planning in an earlier post.

 

Advertisements

Our students have put Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) in first position in the National Student Survey (NSS) for medical schools

It has been the most superb year for BSMS with excellent NSS results. BSMS have scored a near perfect 99% for overall satisfaction and are ranked first, the top spot for undergraduate medical degrees.

The quality of teaching was rated extremely highly, with 100% of participants agreeing that the course is intellectually stimulating and that they have been provided with opportunities to apply what they have learnt. In addition, 98% agreed that staff are good at explaining things and have made the subject interesting.

Dr Juliet Wright, Director of Undergraduate Teaching and Learning at BSMS, says: “I am delighted with our excellent results in the 2017 National Student Survey. Our staff are committed to providing students with an outstanding education in medicine, and the particularly high scores for teaching show we have been successful in achieving this. Results of 100% for the quality of the course and opportunities for students to apply what they have learnt, show that we are clearly preparing our students well for their future careers in the NHS.”

bsmsStudents felt strongly that BSMS provided a positive learning environment, with 97% believing that they felt part of a community of staff and students, and had the right opportunities to work with other students. Access to course-specific resources was also very high at 99%, and sufficient advice and guidance in relation to the course and opportunities to provide feedback both received 98%.

Praise for our document delivery service

If we don’t have what you need in stock, we’ll get it for you from another library. Just complete our online forms on the website:

For books: https://www.bsuh.nhs.uk/library/accessing-information/request-a-book

For journal articles: https://www.bsuh.nhs.uk/library/accessing-information/request-an-article/

This is what our members say about the service:

ILLsTry it today and see for yourself!

 

Making a difference to patient care

We love hearing about how the service we provide to you contributes to patient care so were delighted to receive this email:

“You may be interested to know I would like this paper to give to a patient who is convinced that by being deeply critical of himself he will improve his behaviour. I think this research shows the opposite and supports him taking a more self-compassionate stance, which has been the subject of our work together. So I’d be using it directly in my clinical work.”   Consultant Clinical Psychologist, Sussex Partnership Foundation Trust

Thank you for sharing this with us.

100% satisfaction with our interlibrary loans service

Thank you to everyone who took part in our interlibrary loan survey in June. We are pleased to report that 100% of respondents were satisfied with the service and received the article/book in time to meet their need.

If you require a book or article that is not available in the libraries or with your OpenAthens password please use the request forms on the library website – https://www.bsuh.nhs.uk/work-and-learn/library-services/

We will do our best to obtain the item for you.

Ben Rogers: “how the library helps me”

Picture3Mr Rogers is a BSUH trauma and orthopaedics consultant, academic lead in orthopaedics for HEE KSS, and honorary senior clinical lecturer at BSMS.

Library Matters: How does the library help you?
Ben Rogers: At numerous academic and professional levels.  We teach medical students, and resources to support IRP projects have certainly been helpful.
At postgraduate level everything from journal club, simple audits, letters to journals, published work in all forms —in all facets we rely on the library an awful lot for getting an up-to-date, thorough handle on the knowledge and current evidence.
We don’t have the knowledge, expertise or time to do in-depth searches. We probably run a quick search of Medline and leave it at that, rather than a structured search of all the databases.

LM: Is there anything that has changed practice?
BAR: A recent systematic review on providing aspirin to prevent DVT after elective hip and knee replacement is going to change practice locally, regionally, maybe even more. One of our best IRP studies is a review of cost analyses in orthopaedics. It’s a very good overview on the lack of economic analysis. In the current financial climate, for a high volume speciality like ours, economic evidence for things we do is very important.

LM: How about supplying articles?
BAR: Yes, often on a very short, acute timescale. Not infrequently there’s a key paper we need for governance or to answer a clinical question. The library’s provided these numerous times and been very, very helpful.

LM:  And is it useful to have a clinical librarian in the department?
BAR: Definitely. Every piece of work we publish has to have a good academic rationale, that comes from a decent literature review. I can see it snowballing.